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Government Contractors – 6 Accounting Challenges

Government Contractors – 6 Accounting Challenges

Government Contractors - 6 Accounting Challenges Government contractors have specialized accounting needs. The complex, stringent, and frequently changing requirements of government’ agencies creates many accounting and financial challenges for small to midsized government contractor organizations.

Washington Technology, the authoritative source of competitive intelligence for executives providing contract services to the government market, suggests that there are 6 critical accounting challenges for government contractors. We will share those mistakes below.

1. Not understanding government rules/requirements

Companies that think government accounting involves a slight variation from commercial business are wrong. Through voluminous and ever-changing requirements, such as Cost Accounting Standards, Federal Acquisition Regulations and FAR agency supplements, government contractors must comply with criteria above requirements promulgated by the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

For example, the government restricts executive compensation to what it considers “reasonable.” Compensation above this is considered “unallowable,” meaning it cannot be charged against or recovered from a government contract. Another example: Entertainment charges, including alcoholic beverages, are unallowable.

2. Building a system around an individual

As government contractors grow, they “systematize” the accounting function to improve compliance and may hire a mid- or senior-level accountant to institute a system. A question companies should ask, assuming it is financially possible, is how that system can be maintained if the key individual(s) leaves the business or is incapacitated.

3. Failure to keep pace

Increased government transparency driven by the stimulus plan or the normal run of new regulations, there will be more changes to government accounting and financial management requirements. Companies need to anticipate and implement systems, policies and procedures designed to support compliance with changing requirements.

4. Lack of trained personnel

The system is jeopardized if data is wrong, entered into the system improperly, or internal accounting processes such as contract cost allocations are performed incorrectly. Companies need to ensure they not only have skilled personnel but also have policies and procedures to avoid mistakes and correct them properly when discovered. Personnel unfamiliar with requirements and accounting processes common to government contract accounting often undermine a company’s investment in the accounting software itself.

5. Waiting too long

Your company needs to operate on the assumption that it will face a rigorous government audit, possibly with little or no advance warning. You should be ready and confident that you will obtain a positive evaluation. Once a company is tagged with having a noncompliant accounting system, it is very time-consuming and difficult to regain the government’s acceptance. Indeed, contracts can be terminated, new business opportunities squandered and even payments on existing contracts withheld until improvements are made.

6. Failing to use available information

Implementing an accounting system, designing procedures and following policies to comply with government regulations will make more information available to the contractor, but it has little value if the contractor does not leverage it to manage and grow the company. An overhead rate, for example, must be calculated correctly to comply with government requirements, but if management does not learn why the rate is important and manage spending to control rate variances, it is of little use. With innovative technology, companies are far better able to comply with government contracting requirements and can use the systems to manage and grow their companies while gaining necessary compliance.  

 

To read the full article, click here.

For more information on accounting for government contractors visit: http://brittenford.staging.wpengine.com/industries/government-contractors/

Please share this post with those interested in accounting for government contractors!


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